Hawker Aircraft Sound Recordings

Hawker Aircraft Limited was a British aircraft manufacturer responsible for some of the most famous products in British aviation history.

Hawker had its roots in the aftermath of the First World War which resulted in the bankruptcy of the Sopwith Aviation Company. Sopwith test pilot Harry Hawker and three others, including Thomas Sopwith, bought the assets of Sopwith and formed H.G. Hawker Engineering in 1920.

In 1933 the company was renamed Hawker Aircraft Limited and took advantage of the Great Depression and a strong financial position to purchase the Gloster Aircraft Company in 1934. The next year it merged with the engine and automotive company Armstrong Siddeley and its subsidiary, Armstrong Whitworth Aircraft, to form Hawker Siddeley Aircraft. This group also encompassed A. V. Roe and Company; Avro.

Hawker Aircraft continued to produce designs under its own name as a part of the Hawker Siddeley Aircraft, from 1955 division of Hawker Siddeley Group. The "Hawker" brand name was dropped, along with those of the sister companies, in 1963. The Hawker P.1127 was the last aircraft branded as "Hawker".

The Hawker legacy was maintained by the American company Raytheon who produced business jets (including some derived from the BAe 125, whose original design dated back to de Havilland days) under the "Hawker" name. This was the result of purchasing British Aerospace's product line in 1993. The name is currently used by Hawker Beechcraft after Raytheon's business jet interests (Hawker and Beechcraft) were acquired by investors and merged together.

In the interwar years, Hawker produced a successful line of bombers and fighters for the Royal Air Force, the product of Sydney Camm (later Sir Sydney) and his team. These included the Hawker Hind and the Hawker Hart, which became the most produced UK airplane in the years before the Second World War.

During the Second World War, the Hawker Siddeley company was one of the United Kingdom's most important aviation concerns, producing numerous designs including the famous Hawker Hurricane fighter plane that, along with the Supermarine Spitfire, was instrumental in winning the Battle of Britain. (During the battle, Hawker Hurricanes in service outnumbered all other British fighters combined, and were responsible for shooting down 55 percent of all enemy aircraft destroyed.) - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawker_Aircraft

Also check out The Hawker Hurricane Society.

Hawker Hurricane

Click for Hawker Hurricane sound recordings page

The Hawker Hurricane is a British single-seat fighter aircraft introduced in the late 1930s and used throughout world war two.  The Hurricane was arguably the backbone of the RAF during the battle of Britain although largely overshadowed by the Supermarine Spitfire. The Hawker Hurricane and Supermarine Spitfire shared the same engine, the Rolls Royce Merlin.

The evolution of the aircraft design resulted in a series of aircraft as interceptor-fighters, fighter-bombers (also called "Hurribombers"), and ground support aircraft.

Further modifications resulted in the Hawker Sea Hurricane which enabled operation from ships.

MK1 Hawker Hurricane displaying with the Shuttleworth Sea Hurricane

MK1 Hawker Hurricane displaying with the Shuttleworth Sea Hurricane. Recorded August 2009.

Click for MK1 Hawker Hurricane sound recording page

Hawker Hurricane, Mk2b, "Hurribomber"

Hanger 11's Mk2b Hawker "Hurribomber" Hurricane. Recorded August 2009 in its first year of display.

Click for Hurricane Mk2, August 2009 sound recording page

Hurricane Mk2B, July 2011

Originally built in 1942 this aircraft has been restored to stock Mk IIB fighter-bomber status, the only flying example of the famous ‘Hurri-bombers’. Recorded July 2011, Old Warden.

Click for Hurricane Mk2B Hurri-Bomber sound recording page

Hawker Hurricane Mk2b, July 2011 - entire display

Entire display recording of a Hawker Hurricane Mk2b, recorded July 2011.

Click for Hawker Hurricane Mk2b, July 2011 sound recording page

Hawker Sea Hurricane

Click for Hawker Sea Hurricane sound recordings page

The Hawker Sea Hurricane was an evolution of the standard Rolls Royce Merlin powered Hawker Hurricane designed to allow it to be operated from ships of both the Navy and Merchant Navy.

Hawker Sea Hurricane, May 2009

The Shuttleworth Collection's Sea Hurricane recorded in May 2009

Click for Hawker Sea Hurricane, May 2009 sound recording page

Hawker Hurricane Mk1 & Sea Hurricane

Mk1 Hurricane and Sea Hurricane displaying together at Old Warden during August 2009 display.

Click for Hawker Hurricane Mk1 & Sea Hurricane sound recording page

Hawker Sea Hurricane, June 2009, 3 close fly pasts

Hawker Sea Hurricane, recorded June 2009. This is a short complication of 3 fly pasts. Some very good detail of the RAF-loaned Rolls-Royce Merlin.

Click for Sea Hurricane, June 2009 sound recording page

Sea Hurricane, 6th June 2010

The Shuttleworth Collection's Sea Hurricane recorded 6th June 2010

Click for Sea Hurricane, 6th June 2010 sound recording page

Hawker Sea Hurricane recorded May 2011

Hawker Sea Hurricane recorded 1st May 2011, Shuttleworth Collection, Old Warden

Click for Hawker Sea Hurricane, May 2011 sound recording page

Hawker Demon

Click for Hawker Demon sound recordings page

The Hawker Demon was a fighter variant of the Hart light-bomber, and which the Air Ministry stated should be able to intercept the Hart. The intention was for the Demon to just be an interim fighter until the Hawker Fury, arguably the pinnacle of biplane fighter design, entered service. Over 200 of the Hawker Demon were built for the RAF. The Demon were powered by varying types of the Kestrel engine. It had an armament of a single rear .303 in (7.7 mm) Lewis Gun with two .303 in (7.7 mm) Vickers machine guns in the nose. Large numbers of the Hawker Demon were fitted with an hydraulically powered turret in the rear, which had been tested on the Hawker Hart. The Hawker Demon was also sold to the Royal Australian Air Force. The Demon saw only brief second-line operations during the Second World War.
Production of the Demon was by Hawker and by Boulton Paul Aircraft, Norwich.

Hart Two-Seat Fighter
Two-seat fighter version of the Hart. Used by No. 24 Squadron RAF. Later redesignated as the Hart Fighter.

Demon I
Two-seat fighter aircraft for the RAF.

Australian Demon I
Two-seat fighter aircraft for the RAAF similar to RAF version but fitted with a 600 hp (447 kW) Rolls Royce Kestrel V engine, 64 built.

Australian Demon II
Two-seat training version For the RAAF, standard Demon fitted with dual controls.

Turret Demon
Two-seat fighter version, fitted with a Frazer-Nash gun turret in the rear cockpit.

- http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawker_Demon

Hawker Demon, August 2009

Newly restored Hawker Demon K8203 / G-BTVE display at Old Warden, recorded at its first public outing in August 2009.

The Demon is finished as per it original markings of 64 Sqn at Church Fenton.

This is the only high quality recording of this aircraft available.

Click for Hawker Demon, August 2009 sound recording page

Hawker Hind

Click for Hawker Hind sound recordings page

The British Hawker Hind was a Royal Air Force light bomber of the inter-war years produced by Hawker Aircraft. It was developed from the Hawker Hart day-bomber introduced in 1931.

The Hind went into service in November 1935 and eventually equipped 20 RAF bomber squadrons. A number were also sold to foreign customers including Afghanistan, the Irish Free State, Latvia, Persia (Iran), Portugal, South Africa, Switzerland, and Yugoslavia. By 1937, the Hind was being phased out of frontline service, replaced by the Fairey Battle and Bristol Blenheim, and with many of the Auxiliary Air Force squadrons changing role to fighter or maritime patrol units. At the outbreak of the Second World War 613 Squadron remained retained the Hind in the Army co-operation role before re-equipping the Hawker Hector in November 1939.[1] The Hind found a new career in 1938 as a training aircraft representing the next step up from basic training on Tiger Moths. It continued in use as an intermediate trainer during the Second World War.

In 1941, Hinds flew combat missions in their original role as light bombers. South African Hinds were employed against Italian forces in Kenya, Yugoslav Hinds were used against the Germans and Italians while Iranian Hinds were used briefly when invading Allied British and Soviet contingents attacked Iran. - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawker_Hind

Hawker Hind, May 2008

Hawker Hind recorded at Old Warden,  May 2008.

Click for Hawker Hind, May 2008 sound recording page

Hawker Hind, May 2009

The Shuttleworth Collection's Hawker Hind recorded at Old Warden, May 2009.

Click for Hawker Hind, May 2009 sound recording page

Hawker Sea Fury

Click for Hawker Sea Fury sound recordings page

 

Hawker Sea Fury

The Hawker Sea Fury was a British fighter aircraft developed for the Royal Navy by Hawker during the Second World War. The last propeller-driven fighter to serve with the Royal Navy, it was also one of the fastest production single piston-engined aircraft ever built.

The Hawker Fury was an evolutionary successor to the successful Hawker Typhoon and Tempest fighters and fighter-bombers of World War II. The Fury was designed in 1942 by Sydney Camm, the famous Hawker designer, to meet the Royal Air Force's requirement for a lightweight Tempest Mk.II replacement. Developed as the "Tempest Light Fighter", it used modified Tempest semi-elliptical outer wing panels, bolted and riveted together on the fuselage centerline. The fuselage itself was similar to the Tempest, but fully monocoque with a higher cockpit for better visibility. - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawker_Sea_Fury

Standard power is provided by a Bristol Centaurus XVIIC 18-cylinder twin-row radial engine, producing 2,480 hp

Hawker Sea Fury 1

The sound of a Hawker Sea Fury going through its paces at an airshow in the UK.

Sea Fury VR930 at the Shuttleworth VJ Day display on 7-8-05

Sea Fury FB.11 VR930 was delivered to the Royal Navy at RNAS Culham in March 1948, VR930 then spent from May to December of that year in front-line service with 802 Squadron aboard HMS Vengeance and ashore at RNAS Eglinton. Between December 1948 and August 1953 she was held in reserve at various Aircraft Holding Units at Anthorn, Abbotsinch, Sembawang and Fleetlands, undergoing a Category 4 repair at the Royal Naval Aircraft Yard Donibristle before returning to front-line service again with 801 Squadron. Between August 1953 and July 1954 she flew a further 284 hours with the squadron before going to RNAY Fleetlands for reconditioning. - http://www.royalnavyhistoricflight.org.uk/aircraft/seafury.htm

Standard power is provided by a Bristol Centaurus XVIIC 18-cylinder twin-row radial engine, producing 2,480 hp

Click for Hawker Sea Fury 1 sound recording page

Hawker Sea Fury 2 FB.11

Sea Fury VR930 at the Shuttleworth VJ Day display on 7-8-05

Sea Fury FB.11 VR930 was delivered to the Royal Navy at RNAS Culham in March 1948, VR930 then spent from May to December of that year in front-line service with 802 Squadron aboard HMS Vengeance and ashore at RNAS Eglinton. Between December 1948 and August 1953 she was held in reserve at various Aircraft Holding Units at Anthorn, Abbotsinch, Sembawang and Fleetlands, undergoing a Category 4 repair at the Royal Naval Aircraft Yard Donibristle before returning to front-line service again with 801 Squadron. Between August 1953 and July 1954 she flew a further 284 hours with the squadron before going to RNAY Fleetlands for reconditioning. - http://www.royalnavyhistoricflight.org.uk/aircraft/seafury.htm

Standard power is provided by a Bristol Centaurus XVIIC 18-cylinder twin-row radial engine, producing 2,480 hp

Click for Hawker Sea Fury 2 sound recording page

Hawker Sea Hawk

HAwker Sea Hawk recorded at Old Warden at the Shuttleworth VJ Day display on 7-8-05.

Click for Hawker Sea Hawk sound recording page

Hawker Tomtit

Click for Hawker Tomtit sound recordings page

The Hawker Tomtit was a trainer aircraft in use during the 1930s. A single Tomtit survives in flying condition today, operated by the Shuttleworth Collection at Old Warden in the UK. All the sound recordings you can find here are from that aircraft.

The surviving Hawker Tomtit, K1786 (G-AFTA), was the last in use by the RAF and left the service in 1939. It was flown during world war two by Alex Henshaw and gained modifications in the form of a Spitfire windscreen and faired headrest. These hacks were removed during restoration in 1949 when it was used by Hawker test pilot Neville Duke. In 1960, it was handed over to the Shuttleworth Collection, who returned it to its original colours in 1967.

The Tomtit is powered by a single Armstrong Siddeley Mongoose IIIC 5-cylinder radial engine, capable of 150 hp.

Aircraft Characteristics

Crew:

two, instructor plus trainee

Length:

23 ft 8 in (7.21 m)

Wingspan:

28 ft 6 in (9.70 m)

Height:

8 ft 4 in (2.54 m)

Wing area:

238 ft² (22.1 m²)

Empty weight:

1,100 lb (499 kg)

Loaded weight:

1,750 lb (794 kg)
Powerplant: 1 × Armstrong Siddeley Mongoose IIIC 5-cylinder radial engine, 150 hp (112 kW)

Hawker Tomtit, June 2007

Hawker Tomtit G-AFTA at Old Warden, recorded June 2007.

The image on the left and the sound recording are of the same aircraft and were both recorded at the same time.

Equipment used: Audio Technica AT-822, Sony Hi-MD Minidisc Recorder

Click for Hawker Tomtit, June 2007 sound recording page

Hawker Hunter

Click for Hawker Hunter sound recordings page

The Hawker Hunter was a UK jet fighter aircraft of the 1950s and 1960s. The Hunter served for many years with the Royal Air Force and was widely exported, serving with 19 air forces. A total of 1,972 Hunters were produced by Hawker Siddeley and under licence.

The origins of the Hunter trace back to the Hawker Sea Hawk straight-wing carrier-based fighter. Seeking better performance and fulfillment of the Air Ministry Specification E.38/46, Hawker Aircraft's chief designer Sydney Camm created the Hawker P.1052, which was essentially a Sea Hawk with a 35-degree swept wing. First flying in 1948, the P.1052 demonstrated good performance but did not warrant further development into a production aircraft. As a private venture, Hawker converted the second P.1052 prototype into the [[Hawker P.1081]] with swept tailplanes and revised fuselage, with a single jet exhaust at the rear. First flying on 19 June 1950, the P.1081 was promising enough to draw interest from the Royal Australian Air Force but development went no further and the sole prototype was lost in a crash in 1951.
Meanwhile, in 1946, the Air Ministry issued Specification F.43/46 for a daytime jet-powered interceptor. Camm took the basic P.1052 design and adapted it for the upcoming Rolls-Royce Avon turbojet. The Avon's major advantage over the Rolls-Royce Nene, used in the Sea Hawk, was the axial compressor, which resulted in a much smaller engine diameter and better thrust. In March 1948, the Air Ministry issued Specification F.3/48, to cover development of the project. Initially fitted with a single air intake in the nose and a T-tail, the project rapidly evolved to the more familiar shape. The intakes were moved to the wing roots, to make room for weapons and radar in the nose. A more conventional tail arrangement was devised, as a result of stability concerns. - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hawker_Hunter

 Wing Span

33ft 8in 10.24 m

 Length

45ft 10.5in 13.95 m

 Height

13ft 2in 4.02 m
 Engine

1 x RR Avon 207  10,150 lbs st

 Weight

24,500 lbs 11,110 kg

 Max Speed

  620kts no mach limit, supersonic in shallow dive

 Cruise

360kts: Low Level

0.85 Mach: High Level

 Max Range

  1,200 NM with reserves

 Max Operating Height

51,500 ft

 

 Take Off Distance @ MAUW

3,580 ft 1090 m

 Landing Distance with Chute

2,650 ft 795 m

 G Limits

+7.5g  -3.75g

 No. of Hardpoints

6

Hawker Hunter FGA.9 G-ETPS

Hawker Hunter FGA.9 G-ETPS August 2009. A series of flypasts ending in a very fast and low fly by about 100 feet away. G-ETPS is operated privately and was appearing at the Hawker Hunter reunion at The Shuttleworth Collection.

Click for Hawker Hunter FGA.9 G-ETPS sound recording page

Click for Hawker Hunter T.7 sound recording page

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